Importance of Volunteers: A Guest Post from Addison E.P.

Here is a guest post from 2017 OU Field School student, Addison E.P. on the importance of Oklahoma Anthropological Society volunteers on the field school. [caption id="attachment_284" align="alignright" width="300"] Students Addison E.P (right) and Jenny W. (left) at Deer Creek[/caption] Our excavation efforts would be futile without our volunteers. Several joined us throughout our dig, but there were two men who stuck with us every day. Mick and Barry have been doing avocational archaeology longer than many of us have been alive. Though not “formally” trained, they have both worked with some of the best archaeologists in the country on sites that changed the way we view North American Archaeology.…
Read More

Student guest post: Emily W. on surviving field school

Here is a guest post from Emily, a student with the 2017 OU Field School.   Emily’s Guide to Surviving Your First Week of Field School Buy some quality tent stakes [caption id="attachment_275" align="alignright" width="300"] Emily W. in the field[/caption] Don’t stop drinking water Seriously, don’t. Pants are your friend, not shorts. Don’t lose your hat (like me) Learn everyone’s name ASAP. Dig dogs are the best thing ever Lick the bones. When in doubt, bag it. Don’t use sarcasm after 4pm. Follow these helpful tips to avoid being maimed by your professor or something in the woods. Also, don’t actually lick anything you shouldn’t.
Read More

2017 OU/OSU Field School off to a great start!

The OU/OSU field school is at the Deer Creek site this year. Record flooding around Kaw Lake raised the lake by 25 feet and the roads out to our site were underwater just two weeks ago! Luckily the lake was lowered and the roads dried out and we were able to get out to the site. We have a great group of students this year and they'll be helping us test the exterior fortification ditch, trash mounds, a lithic cache, and pits at the site. We are documenting how tree roots are impacting the site/features and will be providing a full report to the US Army Corps of Engineers later…
Read More

New Deer Creek video

A public affairs specialist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tulsa District recently interviewed Sarah Trabert on her work at the Deer Creek site. [caption id="attachment_256" align="alignleft" width="225"] Trabert standing in tall grass at Deer Creek[/caption] You can watch that video by clicking here.
Read More

Cooley receives $2,200 in grants

Delaney Cooley has been awarded a Colorado Council of Professional Archaeologists Ward Weakly Scholarship, an OU Department of Anthropology Morris E. Opler Memorial Scholarship, and a University of Oklahoma Graduate Student Senate Research Grant to support her MA thesis research. Her thesis will explore how chipped stone materials recovered from Ute archaeological sites can be used to better understand the occupation of the Uncompahgre Plateau and raw material procurement strategies in Colorado.    
Read More

Check your mailboxes (or libraries)!

The new issue of American Antiquity  is out and if you look to the Reports section, you will see an article by Sarah Trabert and colleagues, "Following a Glittering Trail: Geo-Chemical and Petrographic Characterization of Micaceous Sherds Recovered from Dismal River Sites." (more…)
Read More

New paper published!

We have a new paper that was recently published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.You can download the article for free using this link (available till April 1): http://authors.elsevier.com/a/1SXK4,rVDBGB8l A small number of ceramics recovered from sites in the Lake Scott area, including 14SC1 and 14SC409, have a red slip on the exterior and/or interior surfaces. Many of these red slipped sherds look similar to Tewa Red Ware ceramics that were produced in pueblo communities in northern New Mexico. However, their exact origin was unknown (were they actually made in the Southwest?). After careful analysis using a variety of different techniques, we believe that these red ware ceramics were actually…
Read More

Importance of Volunteers: A Guest Post from Addison E.P.

Here is a guest post from 2017 OU Field School student, Addison E.P. on the importance of Oklahoma Anthropological Society volunteers on the field school. [caption id="attachment_284" align="alignright" width="300"] Students Addison E.P (right) and Jenny W. (left) at Deer Creek[/caption] Our excavation efforts would be futile without our volunteers. Several joined us throughout our dig, but there were two men who stuck with us every day. Mick and Barry have been doing avocational archaeology longer than many of us have been alive. Though not “formally” trained, they have both worked with some of the best archaeologists in the country on sites that changed the way we view North American Archaeology.…
Read More

Student guest post: Emily W. on surviving field school

Here is a guest post from Emily, a student with the 2017 OU Field School.   Emily’s Guide to Surviving Your First Week of Field School Buy some quality tent stakes [caption id="attachment_275" align="alignright" width="300"] Emily W. in the field[/caption] Don’t stop drinking water Seriously, don’t. Pants are your friend, not shorts. Don’t lose your hat (like me) Learn everyone’s name ASAP. Dig dogs are the best thing ever Lick the bones. When in doubt, bag it. Don’t use sarcasm after 4pm. Follow these helpful tips to avoid being maimed by your professor or something in the woods. Also, don’t actually lick anything you shouldn’t.
Read More

2017 OU/OSU Field School off to a great start!

The OU/OSU field school is at the Deer Creek site this year. Record flooding around Kaw Lake raised the lake by 25 feet and the roads out to our site were underwater just two weeks ago! Luckily the lake was lowered and the roads dried out and we were able to get out to the site. We have a great group of students this year and they'll be helping us test the exterior fortification ditch, trash mounds, a lithic cache, and pits at the site. We are documenting how tree roots are impacting the site/features and will be providing a full report to the US Army Corps of Engineers later…
Read More

New Deer Creek video

A public affairs specialist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tulsa District recently interviewed Sarah Trabert on her work at the Deer Creek site. [caption id="attachment_256" align="alignleft" width="225"] Trabert standing in tall grass at Deer Creek[/caption] You can watch that video by clicking here.
Read More

Cooley receives $2,200 in grants

Delaney Cooley has been awarded a Colorado Council of Professional Archaeologists Ward Weakly Scholarship, an OU Department of Anthropology Morris E. Opler Memorial Scholarship, and a University of Oklahoma Graduate Student Senate Research Grant to support her MA thesis research. Her thesis will explore how chipped stone materials recovered from Ute archaeological sites can be used to better understand the occupation of the Uncompahgre Plateau and raw material procurement strategies in Colorado.    
Read More

Check your mailboxes (or libraries)!

The new issue of American Antiquity  is out and if you look to the Reports section, you will see an article by Sarah Trabert and colleagues, "Following a Glittering Trail: Geo-Chemical and Petrographic Characterization of Micaceous Sherds Recovered from Dismal River Sites." (more…)
Read More

New paper published!

We have a new paper that was recently published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.You can download the article for free using this link (available till April 1): http://authors.elsevier.com/a/1SXK4,rVDBGB8l A small number of ceramics recovered from sites in the Lake Scott area, including 14SC1 and 14SC409, have a red slip on the exterior and/or interior surfaces. Many of these red slipped sherds look similar to Tewa Red Ware ceramics that were produced in pueblo communities in northern New Mexico. However, their exact origin was unknown (were they actually made in the Southwest?). After careful analysis using a variety of different techniques, we believe that these red ware ceramics were actually…
Read More

Importance of Volunteers: A Guest Post from Addison E.P.

Here is a guest post from 2017 OU Field School student, Addison E.P. on the importance of Oklahoma Anthropological Society volunteers on the field school. [caption id="attachment_284" align="alignright" width="300"] Students Addison E.P (right) and Jenny W. (left) at Deer Creek[/caption] Our excavation efforts would be futile without our volunteers. Several joined us throughout our dig, but there were two men who stuck with us every day. Mick and Barry have been doing avocational archaeology longer than many of us have been alive. Though not “formally” trained, they have both worked with some of the best archaeologists in the country on sites that changed the way we view North American Archaeology.…
Read More

Student guest post: Emily W. on surviving field school

Here is a guest post from Emily, a student with the 2017 OU Field School.   Emily’s Guide to Surviving Your First Week of Field School Buy some quality tent stakes [caption id="attachment_275" align="alignright" width="300"] Emily W. in the field[/caption] Don’t stop drinking water Seriously, don’t. Pants are your friend, not shorts. Don’t lose your hat (like me) Learn everyone’s name ASAP. Dig dogs are the best thing ever Lick the bones. When in doubt, bag it. Don’t use sarcasm after 4pm. Follow these helpful tips to avoid being maimed by your professor or something in the woods. Also, don’t actually lick anything you shouldn’t.
Read More

2017 OU/OSU Field School off to a great start!

The OU/OSU field school is at the Deer Creek site this year. Record flooding around Kaw Lake raised the lake by 25 feet and the roads out to our site were underwater just two weeks ago! Luckily the lake was lowered and the roads dried out and we were able to get out to the site. We have a great group of students this year and they'll be helping us test the exterior fortification ditch, trash mounds, a lithic cache, and pits at the site. We are documenting how tree roots are impacting the site/features and will be providing a full report to the US Army Corps of Engineers later…
Read More

New Deer Creek video

A public affairs specialist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tulsa District recently interviewed Sarah Trabert on her work at the Deer Creek site. [caption id="attachment_256" align="alignleft" width="225"] Trabert standing in tall grass at Deer Creek[/caption] You can watch that video by clicking here.
Read More

Cooley receives $2,200 in grants

Delaney Cooley has been awarded a Colorado Council of Professional Archaeologists Ward Weakly Scholarship, an OU Department of Anthropology Morris E. Opler Memorial Scholarship, and a University of Oklahoma Graduate Student Senate Research Grant to support her MA thesis research. Her thesis will explore how chipped stone materials recovered from Ute archaeological sites can be used to better understand the occupation of the Uncompahgre Plateau and raw material procurement strategies in Colorado.    
Read More

Check your mailboxes (or libraries)!

The new issue of American Antiquity  is out and if you look to the Reports section, you will see an article by Sarah Trabert and colleagues, "Following a Glittering Trail: Geo-Chemical and Petrographic Characterization of Micaceous Sherds Recovered from Dismal River Sites." (more…)
Read More

New paper published!

We have a new paper that was recently published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.You can download the article for free using this link (available till April 1): http://authors.elsevier.com/a/1SXK4,rVDBGB8l A small number of ceramics recovered from sites in the Lake Scott area, including 14SC1 and 14SC409, have a red slip on the exterior and/or interior surfaces. Many of these red slipped sherds look similar to Tewa Red Ware ceramics that were produced in pueblo communities in northern New Mexico. However, their exact origin was unknown (were they actually made in the Southwest?). After careful analysis using a variety of different techniques, we believe that these red ware ceramics were actually…
Read More

Importance of Volunteers: A Guest Post from Addison E.P.

Here is a guest post from 2017 OU Field School student, Addison E.P. on the importance of Oklahoma Anthropological Society volunteers on the field school. [caption id="attachment_284" align="alignright" width="300"] Students Addison E.P (right) and Jenny W. (left) at Deer Creek[/caption] Our excavation efforts would be futile without our volunteers. Several joined us throughout our dig, but there were two men who stuck with us every day. Mick and Barry have been doing avocational archaeology longer than many of us have been alive. Though not “formally” trained, they have both worked with some of the best archaeologists in the country on sites that changed the way we view North American Archaeology.…
Read More

Student guest post: Emily W. on surviving field school

Here is a guest post from Emily, a student with the 2017 OU Field School.   Emily’s Guide to Surviving Your First Week of Field School Buy some quality tent stakes [caption id="attachment_275" align="alignright" width="300"] Emily W. in the field[/caption] Don’t stop drinking water Seriously, don’t. Pants are your friend, not shorts. Don’t lose your hat (like me) Learn everyone’s name ASAP. Dig dogs are the best thing ever Lick the bones. When in doubt, bag it. Don’t use sarcasm after 4pm. Follow these helpful tips to avoid being maimed by your professor or something in the woods. Also, don’t actually lick anything you shouldn’t.
Read More

2017 OU/OSU Field School off to a great start!

The OU/OSU field school is at the Deer Creek site this year. Record flooding around Kaw Lake raised the lake by 25 feet and the roads out to our site were underwater just two weeks ago! Luckily the lake was lowered and the roads dried out and we were able to get out to the site. We have a great group of students this year and they'll be helping us test the exterior fortification ditch, trash mounds, a lithic cache, and pits at the site. We are documenting how tree roots are impacting the site/features and will be providing a full report to the US Army Corps of Engineers later…
Read More

New Deer Creek video

A public affairs specialist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tulsa District recently interviewed Sarah Trabert on her work at the Deer Creek site. [caption id="attachment_256" align="alignleft" width="225"] Trabert standing in tall grass at Deer Creek[/caption] You can watch that video by clicking here.
Read More

Cooley receives $2,200 in grants

Delaney Cooley has been awarded a Colorado Council of Professional Archaeologists Ward Weakly Scholarship, an OU Department of Anthropology Morris E. Opler Memorial Scholarship, and a University of Oklahoma Graduate Student Senate Research Grant to support her MA thesis research. Her thesis will explore how chipped stone materials recovered from Ute archaeological sites can be used to better understand the occupation of the Uncompahgre Plateau and raw material procurement strategies in Colorado.    
Read More

Check your mailboxes (or libraries)!

The new issue of American Antiquity  is out and if you look to the Reports section, you will see an article by Sarah Trabert and colleagues, "Following a Glittering Trail: Geo-Chemical and Petrographic Characterization of Micaceous Sherds Recovered from Dismal River Sites." (more…)
Read More

New paper published!

We have a new paper that was recently published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.You can download the article for free using this link (available till April 1): http://authors.elsevier.com/a/1SXK4,rVDBGB8l A small number of ceramics recovered from sites in the Lake Scott area, including 14SC1 and 14SC409, have a red slip on the exterior and/or interior surfaces. Many of these red slipped sherds look similar to Tewa Red Ware ceramics that were produced in pueblo communities in northern New Mexico. However, their exact origin was unknown (were they actually made in the Southwest?). After careful analysis using a variety of different techniques, we believe that these red ware ceramics were actually…
Read More

Importance of Volunteers: A Guest Post from Addison E.P.

Here is a guest post from 2017 OU Field School student, Addison E.P. on the importance of Oklahoma Anthropological Society volunteers on the field school. [caption id="attachment_284" align="alignright" width="300"] Students Addison E.P (right) and Jenny W. (left) at Deer Creek[/caption] Our excavation efforts would be futile without our volunteers. Several joined us throughout our dig, but there were two men who stuck with us every day. Mick and Barry have been doing avocational archaeology longer than many of us have been alive. Though not “formally” trained, they have both worked with some of the best archaeologists in the country on sites that changed the way we view North American Archaeology.…
Read More

Student guest post: Emily W. on surviving field school

Here is a guest post from Emily, a student with the 2017 OU Field School.   Emily’s Guide to Surviving Your First Week of Field School Buy some quality tent stakes [caption id="attachment_275" align="alignright" width="300"] Emily W. in the field[/caption] Don’t stop drinking water Seriously, don’t. Pants are your friend, not shorts. Don’t lose your hat (like me) Learn everyone’s name ASAP. Dig dogs are the best thing ever Lick the bones. When in doubt, bag it. Don’t use sarcasm after 4pm. Follow these helpful tips to avoid being maimed by your professor or something in the woods. Also, don’t actually lick anything you shouldn’t.
Read More

2017 OU/OSU Field School off to a great start!

The OU/OSU field school is at the Deer Creek site this year. Record flooding around Kaw Lake raised the lake by 25 feet and the roads out to our site were underwater just two weeks ago! Luckily the lake was lowered and the roads dried out and we were able to get out to the site. We have a great group of students this year and they'll be helping us test the exterior fortification ditch, trash mounds, a lithic cache, and pits at the site. We are documenting how tree roots are impacting the site/features and will be providing a full report to the US Army Corps of Engineers later…
Read More

New Deer Creek video

A public affairs specialist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tulsa District recently interviewed Sarah Trabert on her work at the Deer Creek site. [caption id="attachment_256" align="alignleft" width="225"] Trabert standing in tall grass at Deer Creek[/caption] You can watch that video by clicking here.
Read More

Cooley receives $2,200 in grants

Delaney Cooley has been awarded a Colorado Council of Professional Archaeologists Ward Weakly Scholarship, an OU Department of Anthropology Morris E. Opler Memorial Scholarship, and a University of Oklahoma Graduate Student Senate Research Grant to support her MA thesis research. Her thesis will explore how chipped stone materials recovered from Ute archaeological sites can be used to better understand the occupation of the Uncompahgre Plateau and raw material procurement strategies in Colorado.    
Read More

Check your mailboxes (or libraries)!

The new issue of American Antiquity  is out and if you look to the Reports section, you will see an article by Sarah Trabert and colleagues, "Following a Glittering Trail: Geo-Chemical and Petrographic Characterization of Micaceous Sherds Recovered from Dismal River Sites." (more…)
Read More

New paper published!

We have a new paper that was recently published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.You can download the article for free using this link (available till April 1): http://authors.elsevier.com/a/1SXK4,rVDBGB8l A small number of ceramics recovered from sites in the Lake Scott area, including 14SC1 and 14SC409, have a red slip on the exterior and/or interior surfaces. Many of these red slipped sherds look similar to Tewa Red Ware ceramics that were produced in pueblo communities in northern New Mexico. However, their exact origin was unknown (were they actually made in the Southwest?). After careful analysis using a variety of different techniques, we believe that these red ware ceramics were actually…
Read More

Importance of Volunteers: A Guest Post from Addison E.P.

Here is a guest post from 2017 OU Field School student, Addison E.P. on the importance of Oklahoma Anthropological Society volunteers on the field school. [caption id="attachment_284" align="alignright" width="300"] Students Addison E.P (right) and Jenny W. (left) at Deer Creek[/caption] Our excavation efforts would be futile without our volunteers. Several joined us throughout our dig, but there were two men who stuck with us every day. Mick and Barry have been doing avocational archaeology longer than many of us have been alive. Though not “formally” trained, they have both worked with some of the best archaeologists in the country on sites that changed the way we view North American Archaeology.…
Read More

Student guest post: Emily W. on surviving field school

Here is a guest post from Emily, a student with the 2017 OU Field School.   Emily’s Guide to Surviving Your First Week of Field School Buy some quality tent stakes [caption id="attachment_275" align="alignright" width="300"] Emily W. in the field[/caption] Don’t stop drinking water Seriously, don’t. Pants are your friend, not shorts. Don’t lose your hat (like me) Learn everyone’s name ASAP. Dig dogs are the best thing ever Lick the bones. When in doubt, bag it. Don’t use sarcasm after 4pm. Follow these helpful tips to avoid being maimed by your professor or something in the woods. Also, don’t actually lick anything you shouldn’t.
Read More

2017 OU/OSU Field School off to a great start!

The OU/OSU field school is at the Deer Creek site this year. Record flooding around Kaw Lake raised the lake by 25 feet and the roads out to our site were underwater just two weeks ago! Luckily the lake was lowered and the roads dried out and we were able to get out to the site. We have a great group of students this year and they'll be helping us test the exterior fortification ditch, trash mounds, a lithic cache, and pits at the site. We are documenting how tree roots are impacting the site/features and will be providing a full report to the US Army Corps of Engineers later…
Read More

New Deer Creek video

A public affairs specialist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tulsa District recently interviewed Sarah Trabert on her work at the Deer Creek site. [caption id="attachment_256" align="alignleft" width="225"] Trabert standing in tall grass at Deer Creek[/caption] You can watch that video by clicking here.
Read More

Cooley receives $2,200 in grants

Delaney Cooley has been awarded a Colorado Council of Professional Archaeologists Ward Weakly Scholarship, an OU Department of Anthropology Morris E. Opler Memorial Scholarship, and a University of Oklahoma Graduate Student Senate Research Grant to support her MA thesis research. Her thesis will explore how chipped stone materials recovered from Ute archaeological sites can be used to better understand the occupation of the Uncompahgre Plateau and raw material procurement strategies in Colorado.    
Read More

Check your mailboxes (or libraries)!

The new issue of American Antiquity  is out and if you look to the Reports section, you will see an article by Sarah Trabert and colleagues, "Following a Glittering Trail: Geo-Chemical and Petrographic Characterization of Micaceous Sherds Recovered from Dismal River Sites." (more…)
Read More

New paper published!

We have a new paper that was recently published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.You can download the article for free using this link (available till April 1): http://authors.elsevier.com/a/1SXK4,rVDBGB8l A small number of ceramics recovered from sites in the Lake Scott area, including 14SC1 and 14SC409, have a red slip on the exterior and/or interior surfaces. Many of these red slipped sherds look similar to Tewa Red Ware ceramics that were produced in pueblo communities in northern New Mexico. However, their exact origin was unknown (were they actually made in the Southwest?). After careful analysis using a variety of different techniques, we believe that these red ware ceramics were actually…
Read More

Importance of Volunteers: A Guest Post from Addison E.P.

Here is a guest post from 2017 OU Field School student, Addison E.P. on the importance of Oklahoma Anthropological Society volunteers on the field school. [caption id="attachment_284" align="alignright" width="300"] Students Addison E.P (right) and Jenny W. (left) at Deer Creek[/caption] Our excavation efforts would be futile without our volunteers. Several joined us throughout our dig, but there were two men who stuck with us every day. Mick and Barry have been doing avocational archaeology longer than many of us have been alive. Though not “formally” trained, they have both worked with some of the best archaeologists in the country on sites that changed the way we view North American Archaeology.…
Read More

Student guest post: Emily W. on surviving field school

Here is a guest post from Emily, a student with the 2017 OU Field School.   Emily’s Guide to Surviving Your First Week of Field School Buy some quality tent stakes [caption id="attachment_275" align="alignright" width="300"] Emily W. in the field[/caption] Don’t stop drinking water Seriously, don’t. Pants are your friend, not shorts. Don’t lose your hat (like me) Learn everyone’s name ASAP. Dig dogs are the best thing ever Lick the bones. When in doubt, bag it. Don’t use sarcasm after 4pm. Follow these helpful tips to avoid being maimed by your professor or something in the woods. Also, don’t actually lick anything you shouldn’t.
Read More

2017 OU/OSU Field School off to a great start!

The OU/OSU field school is at the Deer Creek site this year. Record flooding around Kaw Lake raised the lake by 25 feet and the roads out to our site were underwater just two weeks ago! Luckily the lake was lowered and the roads dried out and we were able to get out to the site. We have a great group of students this year and they'll be helping us test the exterior fortification ditch, trash mounds, a lithic cache, and pits at the site. We are documenting how tree roots are impacting the site/features and will be providing a full report to the US Army Corps of Engineers later…
Read More

New Deer Creek video

A public affairs specialist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tulsa District recently interviewed Sarah Trabert on her work at the Deer Creek site. [caption id="attachment_256" align="alignleft" width="225"] Trabert standing in tall grass at Deer Creek[/caption] You can watch that video by clicking here.
Read More

Cooley receives $2,200 in grants

Delaney Cooley has been awarded a Colorado Council of Professional Archaeologists Ward Weakly Scholarship, an OU Department of Anthropology Morris E. Opler Memorial Scholarship, and a University of Oklahoma Graduate Student Senate Research Grant to support her MA thesis research. Her thesis will explore how chipped stone materials recovered from Ute archaeological sites can be used to better understand the occupation of the Uncompahgre Plateau and raw material procurement strategies in Colorado.    
Read More

Check your mailboxes (or libraries)!

The new issue of American Antiquity  is out and if you look to the Reports section, you will see an article by Sarah Trabert and colleagues, "Following a Glittering Trail: Geo-Chemical and Petrographic Characterization of Micaceous Sherds Recovered from Dismal River Sites." (more…)
Read More

New paper published!

We have a new paper that was recently published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.You can download the article for free using this link (available till April 1): http://authors.elsevier.com/a/1SXK4,rVDBGB8l A small number of ceramics recovered from sites in the Lake Scott area, including 14SC1 and 14SC409, have a red slip on the exterior and/or interior surfaces. Many of these red slipped sherds look similar to Tewa Red Ware ceramics that were produced in pueblo communities in northern New Mexico. However, their exact origin was unknown (were they actually made in the Southwest?). After careful analysis using a variety of different techniques, we believe that these red ware ceramics were actually…
Read More

Importance of Volunteers: A Guest Post from Addison E.P.

Here is a guest post from 2017 OU Field School student, Addison E.P. on the importance of Oklahoma Anthropological Society volunteers on the field school. [caption id="attachment_284" align="alignright" width="300"] Students Addison E.P (right) and Jenny W. (left) at Deer Creek[/caption] Our excavation efforts would be futile without our volunteers. Several joined us throughout our dig, but there were two men who stuck with us every day. Mick and Barry have been doing avocational archaeology longer than many of us have been alive. Though not “formally” trained, they have both worked with some of the best archaeologists in the country on sites that changed the way we view North American Archaeology.…
Read More

Student guest post: Emily W. on surviving field school

Here is a guest post from Emily, a student with the 2017 OU Field School.   Emily’s Guide to Surviving Your First Week of Field School Buy some quality tent stakes [caption id="attachment_275" align="alignright" width="300"] Emily W. in the field[/caption] Don’t stop drinking water Seriously, don’t. Pants are your friend, not shorts. Don’t lose your hat (like me) Learn everyone’s name ASAP. Dig dogs are the best thing ever Lick the bones. When in doubt, bag it. Don’t use sarcasm after 4pm. Follow these helpful tips to avoid being maimed by your professor or something in the woods. Also, don’t actually lick anything you shouldn’t.
Read More

2017 OU/OSU Field School off to a great start!

The OU/OSU field school is at the Deer Creek site this year. Record flooding around Kaw Lake raised the lake by 25 feet and the roads out to our site were underwater just two weeks ago! Luckily the lake was lowered and the roads dried out and we were able to get out to the site. We have a great group of students this year and they'll be helping us test the exterior fortification ditch, trash mounds, a lithic cache, and pits at the site. We are documenting how tree roots are impacting the site/features and will be providing a full report to the US Army Corps of Engineers later…
Read More

New Deer Creek video

A public affairs specialist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tulsa District recently interviewed Sarah Trabert on her work at the Deer Creek site. [caption id="attachment_256" align="alignleft" width="225"] Trabert standing in tall grass at Deer Creek[/caption] You can watch that video by clicking here.
Read More

Cooley receives $2,200 in grants

Delaney Cooley has been awarded a Colorado Council of Professional Archaeologists Ward Weakly Scholarship, an OU Department of Anthropology Morris E. Opler Memorial Scholarship, and a University of Oklahoma Graduate Student Senate Research Grant to support her MA thesis research. Her thesis will explore how chipped stone materials recovered from Ute archaeological sites can be used to better understand the occupation of the Uncompahgre Plateau and raw material procurement strategies in Colorado.    
Read More

Check your mailboxes (or libraries)!

The new issue of American Antiquity  is out and if you look to the Reports section, you will see an article by Sarah Trabert and colleagues, "Following a Glittering Trail: Geo-Chemical and Petrographic Characterization of Micaceous Sherds Recovered from Dismal River Sites." (more…)
Read More

New paper published!

We have a new paper that was recently published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.You can download the article for free using this link (available till April 1): http://authors.elsevier.com/a/1SXK4,rVDBGB8l A small number of ceramics recovered from sites in the Lake Scott area, including 14SC1 and 14SC409, have a red slip on the exterior and/or interior surfaces. Many of these red slipped sherds look similar to Tewa Red Ware ceramics that were produced in pueblo communities in northern New Mexico. However, their exact origin was unknown (were they actually made in the Southwest?). After careful analysis using a variety of different techniques, we believe that these red ware ceramics were actually…
Read More

Importance of Volunteers: A Guest Post from Addison E.P.

Here is a guest post from 2017 OU Field School student, Addison E.P. on the importance of Oklahoma Anthropological Society volunteers on the field school. [caption id="attachment_284" align="alignright" width="300"] Students Addison E.P (right) and Jenny W. (left) at Deer Creek[/caption] Our excavation efforts would be futile without our volunteers. Several joined us throughout our dig, but there were two men who stuck with us every day. Mick and Barry have been doing avocational archaeology longer than many of us have been alive. Though not “formally” trained, they have both worked with some of the best archaeologists in the country on sites that changed the way we view North American Archaeology.…
Read More

Student guest post: Emily W. on surviving field school

Here is a guest post from Emily, a student with the 2017 OU Field School.   Emily’s Guide to Surviving Your First Week of Field School Buy some quality tent stakes [caption id="attachment_275" align="alignright" width="300"] Emily W. in the field[/caption] Don’t stop drinking water Seriously, don’t. Pants are your friend, not shorts. Don’t lose your hat (like me) Learn everyone’s name ASAP. Dig dogs are the best thing ever Lick the bones. When in doubt, bag it. Don’t use sarcasm after 4pm. Follow these helpful tips to avoid being maimed by your professor or something in the woods. Also, don’t actually lick anything you shouldn’t.
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2017 OU/OSU Field School off to a great start!

The OU/OSU field school is at the Deer Creek site this year. Record flooding around Kaw Lake raised the lake by 25 feet and the roads out to our site were underwater just two weeks ago! Luckily the lake was lowered and the roads dried out and we were able to get out to the site. We have a great group of students this year and they'll be helping us test the exterior fortification ditch, trash mounds, a lithic cache, and pits at the site. We are documenting how tree roots are impacting the site/features and will be providing a full report to the US Army Corps of Engineers later…
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New Deer Creek video

A public affairs specialist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tulsa District recently interviewed Sarah Trabert on her work at the Deer Creek site. [caption id="attachment_256" align="alignleft" width="225"] Trabert standing in tall grass at Deer Creek[/caption] You can watch that video by clicking here.
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Cooley receives $2,200 in grants

Delaney Cooley has been awarded a Colorado Council of Professional Archaeologists Ward Weakly Scholarship, an OU Department of Anthropology Morris E. Opler Memorial Scholarship, and a University of Oklahoma Graduate Student Senate Research Grant to support her MA thesis research. Her thesis will explore how chipped stone materials recovered from Ute archaeological sites can be used to better understand the occupation of the Uncompahgre Plateau and raw material procurement strategies in Colorado.    
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Check your mailboxes (or libraries)!

The new issue of American Antiquity  is out and if you look to the Reports section, you will see an article by Sarah Trabert and colleagues, "Following a Glittering Trail: Geo-Chemical and Petrographic Characterization of Micaceous Sherds Recovered from Dismal River Sites." (more…)
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New paper published!

We have a new paper that was recently published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.You can download the article for free using this link (available till April 1): http://authors.elsevier.com/a/1SXK4,rVDBGB8l A small number of ceramics recovered from sites in the Lake Scott area, including 14SC1 and 14SC409, have a red slip on the exterior and/or interior surfaces. Many of these red slipped sherds look similar to Tewa Red Ware ceramics that were produced in pueblo communities in northern New Mexico. However, their exact origin was unknown (were they actually made in the Southwest?). After careful analysis using a variety of different techniques, we believe that these red ware ceramics were actually…
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